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Using Acronis True Image With RollbackRX Replies appreciated

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  • Using Acronis True Image With RollbackRX Replies appreciated


    ​Before posting here I read this article -

    Is RollBack Rx compatible with Acronis True Image, Norton Ghost, or any other drive imaging software?
    Posted by on 07 Oct 2013

    I was wondering if others here have Acronis and Rollback on the same machine and I have questions regarding compatibility.

    My version of ATI is 2014 - I don't use Secure Zone, as I know and understand that there would be issues re the MBR based on "This first sector is known as the MBR (master boot record) OR GPT. This pre-OS recovery console is the heart of RollBack Rx, and is a required component and cannot be archived into the image".

    My questions are as follows:-

    1.) Before creating an Acronis Backup Image, for the image to work do I need to either uninstall or disable Rollback first??

    2.) If I disable Rollback does it still not have control over the MBR???

    3.) If I disable Rollback and then make a backup with ATI, would I need to uninstall and then reinstall Rollback to establish a new base line?

    4.) I understand the advantage of using DriveCloner in that existing images can be maintained but if I continue to use ATI is there any way to save or keeps old images???

    5.) What worries me is what happens to the MBR with Rollback - Is it the same thing if I disable Rollback or uninstall Rollback, or is there a difference between the two?

    6.) If anyone here is using both ATI and Rollback together, have you encountered any compatibility issues restoring images?

    7.) Can making multiple images with the Pro version of Rollback shorten the life of my SSD?


    8.) If using both products together have you any additional advice that you can offer?

    Any replies are much appreciated.


    Best wishes,

    Howie
    Last edited by HowieEngland; 12-04-2018, 10:29 AM.

  • #2
    Howie, first of all, ATI (any version) is primarily an imaging program... there are many imaging programs out there. When doing an image, they record changed disk clusters of blocks rather than Files/folders... when doing an IMAGE they know not of files. They use the MetaData of the current FileSystem to determine where those changes have been on the surface of the disk. Since Rollback "hides" their snapshot DataBase and structures from the Windows System, imaging programs cannot see them. As a result, when you run any imaging operation on your Rollback-protected LIVE Windows System, it can only see what Windows sees which will be the CURRENT SYSTEM STATE (no RBrx snapshots)... the LIVE System state at the time of the image. Since almost all imaging systems also image your System's BOOT blocks (for recovery purposes), they will wind up with the Rollback modified BOOT blocks in their image, which will not BOOT the System properly should you need to do a System recovery using your ATI image. This is why your image needs to be restored first, then your BOOT block(s) need to be repaired before that System recovery will function properly (there's more work with Rollback once you've BOOTed successfully)... a royal pain.

    To help with this process, HSD created the new DeActivation/reActivation function in their more recent releases. The only difference between DeActivation and unInstall is that Rollback will leave its running application code in place on your System... it no longer is active, your snapshots are GONE and it puts your STANDARD BOOT CODE back in place so that your System may BOOT as normal. This allows users to image their System correctly (disk block changes and a proper BOOT block for recovery purposes). When done, you may reActivate Rollback which will reBOOT your System, reInstall the RBrx special BOOT code, and activate the RBrx snapshot database once again. At this point your System will be exactly as it would be if you had just installed Rollback for the first time... no snapshots.

    Rollback, after extensive testing with all versions since v9.1 that have claimed to "operate properly" with the Windows TRIM function for SSDs, shows that the TRIM command has been DISABLED as far as passing it on to the SSD storage device. This will have long term implications as far as the SSD storage life is concerned. BUT, if you plan to image your System regularly using the Rollback deActivate/reActivate (or unInstall/reInstall) function, just remember to reBOOT your System after you deActivate it. After this reBOOT, the System will remove the Rollback special disk driver which inhibits proper TRIM control of the SSD. At this point, not only can you properly image your CURRENT SYSTEM STATE, you may also run your Windows OPTIMIZATION routines (W8/W10) as well as the "SSDtool" under W07 if you need to do the same there. This will tidy up your SSD and save it from long term non-TRIM life issues. After you're done, just reActivate Rollback and you're back ready to take your 1st snapshot.

    Hopefully the above answers most of your questions (and no, I don't work for HDS )...

    Comment


    • #3
      Many thanks for your excellent concise response Froggie. I now understand what you are saying.

      You mentioned "As a result, when you run any imaging operation on your Rollback-protected LIVE Windows System, it can only see what Windows sees which will be the CURRENT SYSTEM STATE (no RBrx snapshots)... the LIVE System state at the time of the image. Since almost all imaging systems also image your System's BOOT blocks (for recovery purposes), they will wind up with the Rollback modified BOOT blocks in their image, which will not BOOT the System properly".

      Would I be right in assuming if using the current version of Drive ClonerRX, unlike Acronis True Image, that it would recognize Rollback's modified boot blocks, so RollbackRX would not need to deactivated prior to a Drive ClonerRX image being restored?

      Furthermore after restoring an image using Drive ClonerRX, I would need to do nothing with RollbackRX as all created existing images would still be there?

      Thanks again for your excellent response.

      Best wishes,

      Howie

      Comment


      • #4
        Although I was part of the Drive Cloner v6 (DCv6) BETA testing team, the testing period ended on a very bad note for the testers... there were still many outstanding issues with the product when it was taken from the testing team and released to the public. That said, it has been over a year since v6 was released so many of those issues may have been dealt with. I never became a user of Drive Cloner for that reason so I don't know its current status. This THREAD may bring you more up to date on the product and its current pitfalls.

        When testing, DCv6 was fully capable of imaging both your System and its acquired snapshots (including the special RBrx BOOT blocks) and recovering all that information as well. There were many issues with recovery targets that were outstanding but the basic System worked well in uncomplicated System configurations. The best suggestion I can make is to test it if they offer a TRIAL. Start with a no-Rollback System and image it using ATI. Then install Rollback, take some snapshots, then image with Drive Cloner. I would then do a full recovery with ATI (test to make sure it looks like your pre-Rollback test System... it should) followed by a full recovery with Drive Cloner, then make sure your snapshots taken during your test period are all there and available for use.

        That should give you a good idea whether Drive Cloner will work well with your particular System configuration.

        Comment


        • #5
          Many thanks for the sound advice Froggie - I will do what you suggest - Thanks again for your excellent replies which are much appreciated - Advance Merry Christmas to you and your family - Howie

          Comment


          • #6
            Howie, enjoy the holidays

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