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Every Snapshot is GB Size with Most Recent 10.7 Version Installed

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  • Every Snapshot is GB Size with Most Recent 10.7 Version Installed

    Using previous versions of Rollback RX most of the post-baseline snapshots were 300 to 700 MB in size. The largest one I have seen on my system based upon my actual usage patterns was perhaps 1.5 GB in size.

    ​With the current version of Rollback RX 10.7, every snapshot is GB sized without there being anything more than perhaps a few hundred MB actual difference in the snapshot size from the baseline.

    ​On top of it, the system is cleaned very thoroughly before each snapshot is created.

    Anyone else seeing this behavior ?




  • #2
    Hello Hjlbx,

    Thank you for your response. Normally RollBack Rx doesn't take much space on your hard drive. However, if you make any changes after you install RollBack such as installing new programs, or applying Windows Updates is when RollBack Rx will notice a change in data and why your snapshots are taking more disc space as it needs to capture that current state of your machine. Have you tried running the Snapshot Defragmenter tool in RollBack Rx? It should clean-up any sudden lost disc space back to normal.
    Last edited by ShainalR; 07-10-2017, 02:49 PM.

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    • #3
      Hello ShainaIR,

      ​Yes, I've defragmented the snapshots.

      ​I have not changed the manner in which I use Rollback RX. In the previous versions I would use it exactly the same as I am doing now - and with the very same programs. The largest snapshot size that I have seen using the older version was about 1.5 GB - and that was after a cumulative Windows Update was applied.

      ​However, with this new version every single snapshot is 2 GB in size or larger. I clean the system thoroughly before making a snapshot. I agree that some of the newer Windows Updates are large. However, there is only a single snapshot that contains a cumulative update.

      ​I can go back to the 23 GB baseline, immediately take another snapshot (without a single modification to the system), and that immediate new snapshot is 0.6 to 1 GB in size ! That's definitely unexpected behavior.

      Anyway, other than that single observation everything is working as expected. The behavior could be something or it could be nothing. I will keep an eye on it.
      Last edited by hjlbx; 07-11-2017, 01:42 PM.

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      • #4
        Helo Hjlbx,

        Thank you for your response. Just a quick question to ask, are you running any other sort of Windows or Third-Party defragmentation software? If yes, then it's possible that RollBack Rx will notice the defragmentation as an change in data and also cause the snapshots to grow larger in size. If not, then I would suggest to send us the log files and submit a ticket so that our senior technicians can look at this further. Here is our guide below on how to do this:

        http://support.horizondatasys.com/Kn...k-rx-log-files
        Last edited by ShainalR; 07-11-2017, 01:52 PM.

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        • #5
          Probably a silly question but I will ask it anyway...
          Would it not be possible to program Rollback so that it stored its snapshots on a different drive to that of the program itself?
          I mean typically it will always be installed on the C:\ partition which is already heavily loaded with Windows and any programs. With snapshots of 1GB+ and a baseline of 600 to 800 GB it seems to me to be too hungry for disk space where such real estate is in very short supply.

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          • #6
            Rollback uses a "Redirect on Write" technology in the performance of its snapshots. That technology leaves old DATA in place when updating that DATA to a new state... that's what makes it quick. It's also the feature that makes it potentially dangerous. When leaving that snapshot DATA in place, no process, not even Windows, knows where that DATA is except Rollback itself... it can be scary.

            What you're suggesting is a change to a "copy on write" technology, which, basically, is what all imaging systems use to protect a volume. This process is much more time consuming since the snapshot DATA being updated now has to be written somewhere else rather than being left in place...snapshotting would become a much longer process. And during restoration to a snapshot state, that "elsewhere" DATA would have to be rewritten back into the protected volume... another much longer process.

            Some of today's imaging systems have improved this process to a point where the saving and returning to a snapshot (point in time) has become very efficient compared to what it was just a few years ago... still a bit longer of a process than to use Rollback. BUT, imaging Systems completely protect your storage volumes against any type of failure, Rollback does not. Rollback cannot protect a System against a storage device failure. If you're not either imaging your Systems and/or replicating your most important DATA, a failed Rollback protected System is toast.

            Since "redirect on write" technology continues to be a bit faster than "copy on write," AND a change in the product's design from one method to another would be a major undertaking... my guess is that HDS is not even considering such a change in their current product road map.. If I'm wrong with this assumption, I'm sure a HDS Developer or product representative will jump in and correct me... they like to do that
            Last edited by Froggie; 08-05-2017, 12:09 PM.

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            • #7
              Thanks very much for that clarification Froggie. So, as I understand it, imaging or ghosting is currently the only reliable form of protection other than cloud services. Would that be correct?

              My personal feeling, and this comes from a very limited use of my new laptop, is that Windows 10 is likely the source of most of RB's challenges. I find it a despicable operating system that removes ownership of your computer and hands it over to MS. I mean, NEVER until now have I been so heavily bombarded with "you don't have permission to do this" and "you do not have sufficient rights to access that" messages on my own computer!

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              • #8
                Your understanding is correct on both issues. The 1st being imaging as the only true protection for your operating System configuration (other than a complete reBUILD after incident, which can be very painful and time consuming) and imaging or replication being your only real file protector.

                And IMHO, Windows 10 has been a pariah not only as an operating System but it has affected many, many applications, not just Rollback RX,, since its rollout. Even trusted imaging applications have been affected due to major updates of W10 completely re-sizing and re-arranging partitions on one's System, causing havoc with known System geometries. Users of W10 need to be very aware of OS System changes (minor or major) and the possible affects they may have on their System... most general users are not.

                WIndows 10 remains OFF of all my important Systems until I feel that it has really stabilized, which it has not, IMHO (I'm not sure it ever will based on the way Microsoft now "tests" their OS releases <the famous RING System>).

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by ShainalR View Post
                  Helo Hjlbx,

                  Thank you for your response. Just a quick question to ask, are you running any other sort of Windows or Third-Party defragmentation software? If yes, then it's possible that RollBack Rx will notice the defragmentation as an change in data and also cause the snapshots to grow larger in size. If not, then I would suggest to send us the log files and submit a ticket so that our senior technicians can look at this further. Here is our guide below on how to do this:

                  http://support.horizondatasys.com/Kn...k-rx-log-files

                  Sorry for very late reply. The answer is "no" - I am only using the optimize drives functionality shipped with Windows.

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                  • #10
                    Hjlbx, if you're using Win10's OPTIMIZATION, and you have protected HDDs, that process does use defragmentation on your hard disks. That function needs to be turned OFF for protected HDD-based partitions.

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